Doctor who is passionate about acupuncture

Doctor who is passionate about acupuncture

Welcome to my blog

Leading acupuncture specialist for facial rejuvenation, pain relief, stress, anxiety, emotion, depression relief, fertility and miscarriage
Based at Kensington and Chelsea at Central London. Qualified as a medical doctor in Western medicine in China with a Medical degree from Beijing, China and a PhD degree from the UK. Many year research and clinical experiences. This blog is for information only.

My Website

My Guest blog articles and Reviews

Guest blog articles

https://anamayahealth.blogspot.com/2018/03/dr-maggie-ju-talks-about-vulvodynia.html

Reviews and articles

Maggie Ju (2014) Current opinion in acupuncture on stroke rehabilitation

The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 21 Issue 2 September 2014 P9

Maggie Ju. (2015) What Part Does Acupuncture Play in IVF?

The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 22 Issue 1 March 2015 P21

Maggie Ju (2020) The Potentiality of COVID-19 Treatment with Chinese Herbal Medicine in the UK

The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 27 Issue 2 November 2020 P9


Sunday, 11 April 2021

NICE recommends acupuncture for chronic primary pain April 2021

NICE guidelines for chronic primary pain

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) provides national guidance and advice to improve health and social care in England.

NICE guidelines are evidence-based recommendations for health and care in England.

They set out the care and services suitable for most people with a specific condition or need, and people in particular circumstances or settings.

The guidelines help health and social care professionals to: prevent ill health, promote and protect good health, improve the quality of care and services, adapt and provide health and social care services.

Chronic pain is often difficult to treat and can have a significant impact on individuals and their families and carers. Chronic pain may affect between 30% and 50% of the population. Chronic primary pain is the pain with no clear underlying condition or impact of pain is out of proportion to any observable injury or disease.

NICE recommends acupuncture for chronic primary pain April 2021

Acupuncture for chronic primary pain

1.2.5Consider a single course of acupuncture or dry needling, within a traditional Chinese or Western acupuncture system, for people aged 16 years and over to manage chronic primary pain, but only if the course:

is delivered in a community setting and

is delivered by a band 7 (equivalent or lower) healthcare professional with appropriate training and

is made up of no more than 5 hours of healthcare professional time (the number and length of sessions can be adapted within these boundaries) or

is delivered by another healthcare professional with appropriate training and/or in another setting for equivalent or lower cost.

Why the committee made the recommendation

Many studies (27 in total) showed that acupuncture reduced pain and improved quality of life in the short term (up to 3 months) compared with usual care or sham acupuncture. There was not enough evidence to determine longer-term benefits. The committee acknowledged the difficulty in blinding for sham procedures, but agreed that the benefit compared with a sham procedure indicated a specific treatment effect of acupuncture. There was a wide variation among the studies in the type and intensity of the intervention used, and the studies were from many different countries. The committee agreed that the type of acupuncture or dry needling should depend on the individual needs of the person with pain.

Two economic evaluations (1 in the UK) showed that acupuncture offered a good balance of benefits and costs for people with chronic neck pain. However, both studies had limitations; a notable limitation being that the costs of acupuncture seemed low. Threshold analysis based on these studies indicated the maximum number of hours of a band 6 and 7 healthcare professional's time that would make the intervention cost effective.

An original economic model was developed for this guideline, which compared acupuncture with no acupuncture. The model used data from studies with usual care comparisons, not comparisons with sham acupuncture, because the committee agreed that a usual care comparison in an economic model better reflects the real world benefit of the intervention. The model showed that acupuncture was likely to be cost effective. The committee considered the results to be robust, and agreed that the studies used in the model were representative of the whole evidence review. Acupuncture remained cost effective when the assumed benefits and costs were varied (sensitivity analysis).

Overall, the committee agreed that there was a large evidence base showing acupuncture to be clinically effective in the short term (3 months); the original economic modelling also showed it is likely to be cost effective. However, they were uncertain whether the beneficial effects would be sustained long term and were aware of the high resource impact of implementation. Taking these factors into account, the committee made a recommendation to consider acupuncture or dry needling for chronic primary pain, caveated by the factors likely to make the intervention cost effective. These were: only if delivered in the community, and with a maximum of 5 treatment hours (based on the average resource use in the trials in the model and on the threshold analysis), and from a band 7 (equivalent cost or lower) healthcare professional (based on the threshold analysis). It was agreed there may be different ways of delivering the service that enable acupuncture to be delivered for the same costs, which would equally be appropriate. The committee agreed that discontinuing before this total amount of course time would be an option if the person finds that the first few sessions are not effective.

No evidence was found to inform a recommendation for repeat courses of acupuncture. The committee agreed that further research would help to inform future practice (see the recommendation for research on repeat courses of acupuncture for chronic primary pain).

References

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng193/chapter/Recommendations#acupuncture-for-chronic-primary-pain

 

Sunday, 14 March 2021

Massage Therapy adds on acupuncture.

Massage therapy is used to help manage a health condition or enhance wellness. It involves manipulating the soft tissues of the body. Massage has been practiced in most cultures, both Eastern and Western, throughout human history, and was one of the earliest tools that people used to try to relieve pain.

There are many techniques in massage therapy. The most common form of massage therapy in Western countries is called Swedish or classical massage; Other styles include sports massage, clinical massage. Massage traditions derived from Eastern cultures, such as Shiatsu and Tuina.

Adding acupuncture to your massage therapy can achieve better effects or acupuncture is a good replacement of massage therapy, if you can’t get massage treatment.

References

https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/massage-therapy-what-you-need-to-know

Thursday, 11 March 2021

How many new coronavirus variants are circulating at the moment?

New variants of a virus are expected to occur over time, because viruses frequently change through mutation. Sometimes new variants emerge and disappear. Other times, new variants emerge and persist. There is no exception of coronavirus. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been found globally during this pandemic.

Scientists monitor changes in the virus, including changes to the spikes on the surface of the virus to understand how changes to the virus might affect how it spreads and what happens to people who are infected with it.

Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally:

In the UK a variant called B.1.1.7 with a large number of mutations was identified in the autumn of 2020. This variant spreads more easily and quickly than other variants. It has since been detected in many countries around the world.

In South Africa, another variant called B.1.351 emerged independently of B.1.1.7. Originally detected in early October 2020, B.1.351 shares some mutations with B.1.1.7.

In Brazil, a variant called P.1 emerged that was first identified in travelers from Brazil, who were tested during routine screening at an airport in Japan, in early January. This variant contains a set of additional mutations that may affect its ability to be recognized by antibodies.

These variants seem to spread more easily and quickly than other variants, which may lead to more cases of COVID-19.

The good news is that so far, studies suggest that antibodies generated through vaccination with currently authorized vaccines recognize these variants.

References

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/transmission/variant.html

NICE recommends acupuncture for chronic primary pain April 2021

NICE guidelines for chronic primary pain The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) provides national guidance and advice ...