Doctor who is passionate about acupuncture

I love what I do, I am good at it and I am always there for my patients. If you come and see me, you will know why I am standing out. .

Welcome to my blog

Leading acupuncture specialist for facial rejuvenation, pain relief, stress relief, fertility, fatigue, anxiety.
Based at Kensington, Chelsea, Harley Street Central London.Qualified as a medical doctor in Western medicine in China with a Medical degree from Beijing, China and a PhD degree from the UK. Many year research and clinical experiences

My profile

Acupuncture practice contact for appointments and addresses

Kensington: book online or call at 02030110355 or email at info@anamaya.co.uk
Address: Anamaya 1 Adam and Eve Mews, Kensington, London W8 6UG
2 min walk from High Street Kensington underground station

Chelsea: book online or call 02033623366

Address: Triyoga Chelsea 372 King's road, SW3 5UZ

20 min walk from Sloan Square tube station

Harley Street: for appointments at Harley Street (Fridays) please email at maggieacupuncture@gmail.com

Address: 4 Harley Street, London W1G 9PH

5 min walk from Oxford Circus underground station

My background: I became a qualified medical doctor in Western medicine in China and was well trained in Western medicine together with Chinese medicine in the best Medical University in Beijing, China. Particularly I was trained with Ji-sheng Han famous professor and neuroscientist in China and with Dr Zheren Xuan--famous orthopedics expert and founder of soft tissue surgery in China. Furthermore I had training in dermatology and oral and maxilofacial surgery in China. Also I had training in fertility and had research experiences in uterine smooth muscles and blood vessels in China and the UK. I am dedicated to treat patients with acupuncture and am recognised as one of the world leading acupuncture specialists.


I obtained a PhD degree in the University of Leeds in the UK.
I had post doctoral training and worked as a senior researcher in St George's hospital, London, UK.
I had frequently presented my research findings in the top international conferences in the field.
I have many publications including ebooks and articles.

I have many year clinical experiences. Over the years of practicing in London, I have developed unique effective treatment approaches for cosmetic acupuncture, acne, pain relief including vulvodynia, bladder pain, pelvic pain, chronic prostatitis, neck pain, headache, migraine, shoulder pain, back pain, stress relief, anxiety, fatigue, fertility, hot flushes, nerve pain, insomnia to achieve best treatment results.

My devotion and skills are highly praised by my patients.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKdoRpfr0ic

Guest blog articles and Reviews

Guest blog articles
https://anamayahealth.blogspot.com/2018/03/dr-maggie-ju-talks-about-vulvodynia.html

Reviews
M Ju. (2015) What Part Does Acupuncture Play in IVF?
The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 22 Issue 1 March 2015 P21

Sunday, 28 June 2020

Chinese herbs are often used for unblocking the milk duct

Blocked milk duct
A blocked milk duct leading to milk trapped in the breast is one of the main causes of mastitis. If a breast doesn't completely empty at feedings, one of your milk ducts can become clogged. The blockage causes milk to back up, leading to breast infection. The inflammation results in breast pain, swelling, warmth and redness. You might also have fever and chills.

Chinese herbs are often used for unblocking the milk duct
Bai Zhi ( Dahurica Angelica root), Chi Shao (Red Peony Root), Dang Gui (Angelica root), Gan Cao (Liquorice), Gan Jiang (Dried ginger), Gou Qi Zi (Goji berries), Gua Lou (Trichosanthis Fruits), Jie Geng (Platycodon root), Jin Yin Hua (Honeysuckle flowers), Ju Hua (Chrysanthemum flowers), Lu Lu Tong ( Fructus Liquidambaris ), Pu Gong Ying (Dandelions), Niu Bang Zi (Greater burdock fruits), Mei Gui Hua (Rose flower), Tong Cao (Ricepaperplant Pith), Rou Gui (Cinnamon bark), Ru Xiang (Frankincense), Si Gua Luo (Sponge gourd), Wang Bu Liu Xin (Vaccariae Seeds), Zi Hua Di Ding (Viola herb).

Saturday, 27 June 2020

Chinese herbs are often used for lactation (breast milk boost)

Breastfeeding is good for both baby and mother.

The Benefits of Breastfeeding for the Baby: Breast milk provides perfect natural nutrition including vitamins, proteins and energy for baby’s needs to grow. Breast milk contains antibodies that help your baby fight off viruses and bacteria and have fewer infections. Breastfeeding lowers your baby's risk of having asthma or allergies. The physical closeness, skin-to-skin touching, and eye contact all help the baby bond with mother and feel secure. Breastfeeding has been linked to higher IQ scores in later childhood in some studies.

Breastfeeding Benefits for the Mother:
Breastfeeding burns extra calories helping lose pregnancy weight faster. It releases the hormone oxytocin, which helps the uterus return to its none pregnancy size and may reduce uterine bleeding after birth.
We use natural herbal ingredients in Chinese herbal medicine to boost milk production and help breastfeeding.

Chinese herbs are often used for lactation (breast milk boost)
Bai Shao (White Peony Root), Bai Zhi (Dahurica Angelica root), Dang Gui (Angelica root), Fu Ling (Poria Mushroom), Gan Cao (Liquorice),Ge Geng (Kudzu root), Huang Jing (Polygonatum Rhizome), Huang Qi (Astragalus Root), Long Yan Rou (Longan Fruit), Jie Geng (Balloon Flower Root), Lu Lu Tong ( Fructus Liquidambaris ), Mei Gui Hua (Rose flower), Mu Gua (Flowering quince),Rou Gui (Cinnamon bark), Sha Ren (Amomum fruit), Shan Yao (Chinese Yam), Si Gua Luo (Sponge gourd), Shu Di (Processed Rehmannia Root), Tong Cao (Ricepaperplant Pith), Wang Bu Liu Xin (Vaccariae Seeds), Yu Zhu (Angular solomon's seal root)
All herbs are used for lactation without artificial aroma, preservative, or sugar. They are 100% natural plants. They are good for both mothers and babies.
References
https://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/nursing-basics#1

Sunday, 21 June 2020

Chinese herbs are often used for boosting energy, balance hormones and reduce anxiety

Fatigue and boosting energy

Fatigue is one of the most chief complaints in clinical settings. There are two main types of fatigue: physical and mental. With physical fatigue you may find it physically hard to do the things you usually do, such as walking, climbing the stairs. With mental fatigue, you may find it harder to concentrate on things and stay focused. You may feel sleepy or have difficulty staying awake while working. Physical and mental fatigue are different, but they often occur together. Repeated physical exhaustion can lead to mental fatigue over time and vice versa. The main symptom of fatigue is exhaustion with physical or mental activity. You don’t feel refreshed after resting or sleeping and hard to carry on daily activities. The symptoms of fatigue may be physical, mental, or emotional. Common symptoms associated with fatigue can include: muscles aching, a lack of motivation, drowsiness, difficulty concentrating or learning new tasks, gastrointestinal problems, such as bloating, abdominal pain, constipation or diarrhea, headaches, mood changes, irritability and slowed reaction etc. Poor sleep, stress anxiety, imbalanced hormones, chronic pain often are associated to the fatigue.

Chinese herbs are often used for boosting energy, balance hormones and reduce anxiety
Bai Zhu ( White Atractylodes), Bai Zi Ren (Biota Seed), Chai Hu (Bupleurum Root), Chen Pi,(Sun Dried Tangerine Peels), Da Zao(Date), Chi Shao (Red Peony Root), Chuan Xiong (Sichuan Lovage Rhizome), Dan Shen (Red Sage Root), Dang Gui(Dong Quai), Dang Shen (Codonopsis Pilosula), Dong Chong (Cordyceps).Fu Ling (Poria Mushroom), Gan Cao (Licorice Root), Gou Qi Zi (Goji Berry), Han Lian Cao (Eclipta), He Shou Wu (Fo-Ti), Hong Jing Tian (A. Rhodiola), Huang Qi (Astragalus Root), Jie Geng (Balloon Flower Root), Long Yan Rou( Longan Fruit), Mu Dan Pi (Tree Peony Root Bark), Mai Men Dong (Radix Ophiopogonis), Mu Xiang (Costus Root ), Ren Shen (Ginseng), Sha Ren (Cardamom Seed), Shan Yao (Chinese Yam), Shan Yu Rou ( Cornus Fruit) , Sheng Jiang (Ginger), Shi Chang Pu (Acorus Root), Shu Di (Processed Rehmannia Root), Suan Zao Ren (Sour Jujube Seeds), Tian Men Dong (Wild Asparagus), Tu Si Zi (Dodder), Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra Berry), Xuan Shen (Ningpo Figwort), Yuan Zhi (Polygala Root), Ze Xie (Alisma).

Thursday, 18 June 2020

Chinese herbs are often used for insomnia

Insomnia

Sleep is a natural state of mind and body. During sleep, most of the body’s system are in an anabolic state, the consciousness is altered, sensory activity is inhibited, muscle activity is reduced and the body interaction with surroundings is reduced. Sleep helps to restore the immune, nervous, skeletal and muscular systems; It is also vital to maintain mood, memory and cognitive function. The internal circadian clock promotes sleep daily at night.

If you have regular problems of sleeping, this could be a sleep disorder. Insomnia is the most common type of sleep disorder. People with insomnia find it difficult to fall asleep, stay asleep, or both. They often don’t feel refreshed when they wake up from sleeping.

The symptoms of insomnia include trouble falling or staying asleep, waking too early in the morning, unrefreshing sleep. The accompanied symptoms include fatigue, mood changes, irritability, difficulty concentrating during the day.

Chinese herbs are often used for insomnia

Bai Zhu (White Atractylodes), Bai Zi Ren (Biota Seed), Da Zao(Date), Dang Gui(Dong Quai), Dang Shen (Codonopsis Pilosula), Dan Shen (Red Sage Root), Dong Chong (Cordyceps), Gan Cao (Licorice Root), Fu Ling (Poria Mushroom), Hong Hua (Safflower), Huang Qi(Astragalus Root), Jie Geng (Balloon Flower Root), Long Yan Rou( Longan Fruit), Mai Men Dong (Radix Ophiopogonis), Mu Xiang (Costus Root), Ren Shen (Ginseng), Sheng Jiang (Ginger), Shi Chang Pu (Acorus Root), Shu Di (Processed Rehmannia Root), Suan Zao Ren (Sour Jujube Seeds), Tao Ren (Peach Kernel), Tian Men Dong (Wild Asparagus), Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra Berry), Xuan Shen (Ningpo Figwort), Yuan Zhi(Polygala Root).

Saturday, 13 June 2020

Chinese herbs are often used for infertility

Chinese herbs are often used for infertility

Ai Ye (Mugwort Leaf), Ba Jie Tian ( Medicinal Morinda Root ), Bai Zhu (White Atractylodes), Bai Shao (White Peony Root), Chai Hu ( Bupleuri Radix),Chi Shao (Red Peony Root), Chuan Xiong (Lovage Tuber, Rhizoma Ligustici Wallachii), Da Zao (Date), Dang Gui (Angelica root), Dang Shen (Codonopsis Pilosula), Fu Ling (Poria Mushroom). Fu Pen Zi (Chinese Raspberry), Gan Cao (Licorice Root), Gou Qi Zi (Goji Berry), Han Lian Cao (Eclipta), He Shou Wu (Fo-Ti), Hong Hua ( Safflower), Hong Jing Tian (Rhodiola Rosea), Huang Jing (Polygonatum Rhizome), Huang Qi (Astragalus Root), Ji Xue Teng (Millettia), Lian Zi(Lotus Seed), Long Yan Rou (Longan Fruit), Lu Lu Tong ( Fructus Liquidambaris ), Mu Dan Pi (Tree Peony Root Bark), Mu Xiang (Costus Root), Ren Shen (Ginseng), Rou Gui (Cinnamon Bark), Sang Ji Sheng (Mulberry Mistletoe Stems), Shan Zhu Yu (Cornus), Shan Yao (Chinese Yam), Sheng Jiang (Ginger), Suan Zao Ren (Sour Jujube Seeds), Shu Di (Processed Rehmannia Root), Tao Ren ( Peach Kernel), Tu Si Zi (Chinese Dodder Seeds), Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra Berry), Xian Mao (Curculigo), Xiang Fu (Cyperus Rhizome), Xu Duan (Teasel Root), Yuan Zhi (Polygala Root), Ze Xie (Alisma).

Friday, 12 June 2020

Chinese herbs that are often used for skin conditions

Chinese herbs that are often used for skin conditions

Bai Mao Gen (Woolly Grass Rhizome), Bai Shao (White Peony Root), Bai Zhu (White Atractylodes ), Bei Sha Shen (Radix Glehniae), Bo He (Peppermint), Cang Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis Lancea), Chai Hu (Bupleurum Root), Che Qian Zi (Plantago Seed, or Plaintain Seed), Chi Shao (Red Peony Root), Chuan Xin Lian (Andrographis), Dan Shen (Red Sage Root), Dang Gui (Radix Angelicae Sinensis), Di Fu Zi (Kochia Fruit), Lian Qiao (Forsythia Fruit), Ku Di Ding (Herba Violae), Fang Feng (Radix Ledeouriellae), Fu Ling (Poria Mushroom ),Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae, Licorice Root), Huang Qin (Radix Scutellaria), Jin Yin Hua (Honeysuckle Flower), Jing Jie (Herba Schizonepetae), Ku Shen (Redix Sophorae Flavescenti), Long Dan Cao (Chinese Gentian Root), Mu Dan Pi (Tree Peony Bark), Niu Bang Zi (Fructus Arctii), Pu Gong Ying (Dandelion), Da Huang (Rhubarb Root), Qian Cao (Madder Root), Sheng Di Huang (Raw Rehmannia Root), Tao Ren (Peach Kernel), Tong Cao (Rice Paper Pith), Tu Fu Ling(Sarsaparilla Root), Yi Yi Ren (Coix Seed), Ze Xie (Alisma), Zhi Mu (Rhizoma Anemarrhenae), Zhi Zi (Gardenia Fruit), Zhu Ye (Bamboo Leaves).

Tuesday, 9 June 2020

Chinese medicine stories: Rehmanniae Radix, Rehmanniae Root, Di Huang


Rehmanniae Radix, Rehmanniae Root, Di Huang
It was some time in Tang dynasty that a plague broke up along the downstream of Huang He river. Many people died. The county Mayor went to herb King temple in mountain Shen Nong to ask protection. He was offered an herb plant called Di Huang (Huang meant Emperor which meant that it was given by Emperor. He was told that these herb plants grew in a place over the mountain. The Mayor got some people to climb up to the mountains to pick up the herbs. The herbs saved many people’s lives. After the outbreak, people started to plant the herbs and called them Di Huang due to their yellow colour. Huang meant yellow this time not Emperor.
Rehmanniae Radix are cultivated in many provinces on the south of Yang Zi river in China, such as Hu Bei and Zhe Jiang provinces.
They are sweet and a little bitter in taste and very cold, non-toxic in nature. They are attributed to the heart, liver, and kidneys meridians.
Therefore, it clears the heat and cools the blood. It is used to remove toxin from the blood to detoxify, increase body fluid, and reduce thirst. It is also used for breaking fevers, cardiac stimulation, and hemostasis.
Morden pharmacological effects:
1, Rehmanniae Radix have anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation effects. They are effective in treating dermatitis such as atopic dermatitis.
2, They are effective in reducing blood sugar and in restoring STZ-induced pancreatic islet damage.
3, They are effective in activating the autonomic nervous system, but effectively affects vital signs.
4, They are effective for improving cognitive function, antidepressant action, and immunity control, for treating cervical cancer and nephrotic hypertension, and for repairing damaged liver tissue. It can also reduce intestinal peristalsis.
References
Seok-hee Kim  et al J Pharmacopuncture. 2017 Jun; 20(2): 81–88.

Friday, 5 June 2020

Longan arillus , Longan fruits, Long Yan Rou, Gui Yuan


It was long time ago. There was an evil dragon in Fu Jiang province. Every August this dragon brought hurricanes to the area to destroy crops, collapse the houses, kill people and animals. Local people had to leave their home and hide in caves. A young guy called Gui Yuan who was good at Martial arts decided to fight and get rid of the evil dragon. In the August, the dragon with the hurricanes arrived. Gui Yuan gave it pork and lamb marinated with alcohol which made its mouth-watering. It ate all the food in a second and lay down and fall sleep. Gui Yuan stabbed the its left eye and took the eyeball out. It rolled with extreme pain and wanted to escape. Gui Yuan grabbed its dragon horns, rode on it, and took its right eyes out. The dragon screamed with pain and died, however Gui Yuan was injured badly during the fight and sadly died as well. He was buried with the dragoneyes. Hereafter, a tree grew there, and its fruits were like dragon eyes which were called Long Yan which means dragon eyes. These fruits were also called Gui Yuan in memory of the hero Gui Yuan.  
Longan fruits are widely distributed in Southeast Asia, such as South China, (Fu Jian province is number one producer in China), Taiwan, Vietnam, and Thailand. Longan fruits are sweet in taste and warm in nature. Their white arils are delicious and edible and full of nutrition, such as vitamins A and C, amino acids, and minerals including iron and magnesium, fibers etc. They are attributed to heart and spleen meridians. Longan fruits can be used as Chinese herbal medicine. Daily dosage is 9-15g. They replenish heart and spleen, nourish blood and sooth nerves.
Their modern pharmacological effects include:
1, Calming the nerves with neuroprotection, relieving anxiety and insomnia, improving nerve pain and swelling.
2, antioxidant effects, antiaging, boosting energy, improving memory,
3, immunomodulatory effects and strengthening immunity
4, others: such as anti-diabetes, skin care, anticancer, promoting blood metabolism to tonic blood, help vision etc.
References
Xiang-rong Zhu  J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2019 Jun; 20(6): 503–512.

Thursday, 4 June 2020

The Chinese medicine formula used in China for Coronavirus treatment

This is the Chinese medicine formula used in China for Coronavirus treatment
 from National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Diagnosis and Treatment Protocol for COVID-19

(Trial Version 7)

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment

The COVID-19 belongs to plague in TCM with the etiology of epidemic factor exposure. Different regions can refer to the following plans for syndrome differentiation and treatment, according to the disease, local climate characteristics and different constitutions. Prescriptions which exceed maximum dose according to pharmacopoeia should be used under the guidance of a physician.

(1) Medical observation period

1.1 Clinical manifestation: fatigue with gastrointestinal discomfort

Recommended Chinese patent medicine: Huoxiang Zhengqi Capsule (Pill, Liquid, Oral liquid)

1.2 Clinical manifestation: fatigue with fever

Recommended Chinese patent medicines: Jinhua Qinggan Granule, Lianhua Qingwen Capsule (Granule), Shufeng Jiedu Capsule (Granule)

(2) Clinical treatment period (confirmed cases)

1) Qingfei Paidu Decoction

Scope of application: in accordance with the clinical observations of doctors in various locations, it is suitable for mild, moderate and severe cases, and can be used reasonably with the consideration of the actual conditions of critically ill patients.

The basic formula: Ma Huang (Ephedrae Herba) 9g, Zhi Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 6g, Xing Ren (Armeniacae Semen) 9g, Sheng Shi Gao (Gypsum fibrosum) (decocted first) 15-30g, Gui Zhi (Cinnamomi Ramulus) 9g, Ze Xie (Alismatis Rhizoma) 9g, Zhu Ling (Polyporus) 9g, Bai Zhu (Atractylodis macrocephalae Rhizoma) 9g, Fu Ling (Poria) 15g, Chai Hu (Bupleuri Radix) 16g, Huang Qin (Scutellariae Radix) 6g, Jiang Ban Xia (Pinellinae Rhizoma Praeparatum) 9g, Sheng Jiang (Zingiberis Rhizoma recens) 9g, Zi Wan (Asteris Radix) 9g, Kuan Dong Hua (Farfarae Flos) 9g, She Gan (Belamcandae Rhizoma) 9g, Xi Xin (Asari Radix et Rhizoma) 6g, Shan Yao (Dioscoreae Rhizoma) 12g, Zhi Shi (Aurantii Fructus immaturus) 6g, Chen Pi (Citri reticulatae Pericarpium) 6g, Huo Xiang (Pogostemonis Herba) 9g.

Administration: traditional Chinese herbal pieces in decoction. One package per day. Take warm twice (40 minutes after meal in the morning and evening). One course of treatment is for three packages.

If possible, half bowl of rice soup after taking the decoction is advised. For the patients with dry tongue due to fluid depletion, one bowl of rice soup is suggested. (Note: If no fever, the dosage of gypsum should be reduced. In case with fever or high fever, the amount of gypsum can be increased. If the symptoms improve but not toally recovered, continue the second course of treatment. If the patient has a special condition or other underlying diseases, the formula can be modified according to the actual situation in the second course. If the symptoms disappear, the drug should be discontinued.

Reference: The General Office of the National Health Commission of the people’s Republic of China The Office of the National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine “Notice on Recommending the Use of Qingfei Paidu Decoction in Pneumonia Treated with Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine for the COVID-19 Infection” (National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine Office Medical Letter [2020] No.22)

2) Mild case

 Cold-damp constraint in the lung pattern

Clinical manifestation: fever, fatigue, generalized body aches, cough, expectoration, chest tightness and labored breathing, poor appetite, nausea, vomiting and sticky stool, pale enlarged tongue with tooth marks or light red tongue and coating which is white, thick, curd-like, and greasy or white and greasy, and soggy of slippery pulse.

Recommended formula: Sheng Ma Huang (Ephedrae Herba) 6g, Sheng Shi Gao (Gypsum fibrosum) 15g, Xing Ren (Armeniacae Semen) 9g, Qiang Huo (Notopterygii Rhizoma seu Radix) 15g, Ting Li Zi (Lepidii/Descurainiae Semen) 15g, Guan Zhong (Cyrtomii Rhizoma) 9g, Di Long (Pheretima) 15g, Xu Chang Qing (Cynanchi paniculati Radix) 15g, Huo Xiang (Pogostemonis Herba) 15g, Pei Lan (Eupatorii Herba) 9g, Cang Zhu (Atractylodis Rhizoma) 15g, Yun Ling (Poria) 45g, Sheng Bai Zhu (Atractylodis macrocephalae Rhizoma) 30g, Jiao San Xian (Jiao Shan Zha (Crataegi Fructus), Jiao Shen Qu (Massa medicate fermentata), and Jiao Mai Ya (Hordei Fructus germinatus)) 9g each, Hou Po (Magnoliae officinalis Cortex) 15g, Jiao Bing Lang (Arecae Semen) 9g, Wei Cao Guo (Tsaoko Fructus) 9g, Sheng Jiang (Zingiberis Rhizoma recens) 15g.

Administration: one package daily, 600ml after decocting, divide into three times, equally in the morning, afternoon and evening, take before meal.

 Damp-heat accumulation in the lung pattern

Clinical manifestation: low-grade fever or absence of fever, slight aversion to cold, fatigue, heavy sensation in the head and body, muscle soreness, dry cough with little sputum, sore throat, thirst without desire to drink, or accompanied with chest tightness and epigastric fullness, absence of sweating or disturbed hidrosis, or vomiting with anorexia, loose stool or sticky stool. The tongue is light red and coating is white, thick and greasy or thin and yellow. The pulse is slippery and rapid or soggy.

Recommended formula: Bing Lang (Arecae Semen) 10g, Cao Guo (Tsaoko Fructus) 10g, Hou Po (Magnoliae officinalis Cortex) 10g, Zhi Mu (Anemarrhenae Rhizoma) 10g, Huang Qin (Scutellariae Radix) 10g, Chai Hu (Bupleuri Radix) 10g, Chi Shao (Paeoniae Radix rubra) 10g, Lian Qiao (Forsythiae Fructus) 15g, Qing Hao (Artemisiae annuae Herba) (added later) 10g, Cang Zhu (Atractylodis Rhizoma) 10g, Da Qjng Ye (Isatidis Folium) 10g, Sheng Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 5g.

Administration: one pack daily, 400ml after decocting, divide into twice, and half in the morning and half in the evening.

3) Moderate case

 Damp-toxin constraint in the lung pattern

Clinical manifestation: fever, cough with little sputum or yellow sputum, chest tightness and shortness of breath, abdominal distension, and constipation with difficult defecation. The tongue body is dark-red, and tongue shape is enlarged. The cotaing is yellow greasy or yellow dry. The pulse is slippery and rapid or wiry and slippery.

Recommended formula: Sheng Ma Huang (Ephedrae Herba) 6g, Ku Xing Ren (Armeniacae Semen) 15g, Sheng Shi Gao (Gypsum fibrosum) 30g, Sheng Yi Yi Ren (Coicis Semen) 30g, Mao Cang Zhu (Atractylodis Rhizoma) 10g, Guang Huo Xiang (Pogostemonis Herba) 15g, Qing Hao Cao (Artemisiae annuae Herba) 12g, Hu Zhang (Polygoni cuspidati Rhizoma) 20g, Ma Bian Cao (Verbenae Herba) 30g, Gan Lu Gen (Phragmitis Rhizoma) 30g, Ting Li Zi (Lepidii/Descurainiae Semen) 15g, Hua Ju Hong (Citri grandis Exocarpium rubrum) 15g, Sheng Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 10g.

Administration: one package daily, 400ml after decocting, and equally divide into twice, in the morning and evening.

 Cold-damp obstructing the lung pattern

Clinical manifestation: low-grade fever, unsurfaced fever or no fever, dry cough with little sputum, lassitude and fatigue, chest tightness, stomach discomfort, or nausea, and loose stool. The tongue is pale or light red and coating is white or white greasy. The pulse is soggy.

Recommended formula: Cang Zhu (Atractylodis Rhizoma) 15g, Chen Pi (Citri reticulatae Pericarpium) 10g, Hou Po (Magnoliae officinalis Cortex) 10g, Huo Xiang (Pogostemonis Herba) 10g, Cao Guo (Tsaoko Fructus) 6g, ShengMa Huang (Ephedrae Herba) 6g, Qiang Huo (Notopterygii Rhizoma seu Radix) 10g, Sheng Jiang (Zingiberis Rhizoma recens) 10g, Bing Lang (Arecae Semen) 10g.

Administration: one package daily, 400ml after decocting, and equally divide into twice, in the morning and evening.

4) Severe case

 Epidemic toxin blocking the lung pattern

Clinical manifestation: fever with red face, cough with little yellow and sticky sputum, or blood-stained sputum, chest tightness and short of breath, lassitude, dryness, bitterness and stickiness in the mouth, nausea and loss of appetite, difficult defecation, and scanty dark urine. The tongue is red with yellow greasy coating. The pulse is slippery and rapid.

Recommended formula: Huashi Baidu Formula

The basic formula: Sheng Ma Huang (Ephedrae Herba) 6g, Xing Ren (Armeniacae Semen) 9g, Sheng Shi Gao (Gypsum fibrosum) 15g, Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 3g, Huo Xiang (Pogostemonis Herba) (added later) 10g, Hou Po (Magnoliae officinalis Cortex) 10g, Cang Zhu (Atractylodis Rhizoma) 15g, Cao Guo (Tsaoko Fructus) 10g, Fa Ban Xia (Pinellinae Rhizoma Praeparatum) 9g, Fu Ling (Poria) 15g, Sheng Da Huang (Rhei Radix et Rhizoma) (added later) 5g, Sheng Huang Qi (Astragali Radix) 10g, Ting Li Zi (Lepidii/Descurainiae Semen) 10g, Chi Shao (Paeoniae Radix rubra) 10g.

Administration: 1-2 packages daily, decoction, 100-200ml each time, 2-4 times per day, oral administration or nasal feeding.

 Blazing of both qi and ying pattern

Clinical manifestation: high fever with polydipsia, tachypnoea and shortness of breath, delirium and unconsciousness, blurred vision or accompanied with macules and papules, or hematemesis, epistaxis or convulsion of the four limbs. The tongue is crimson with little or no coating. The pulse is deep, thready and rapid, or floating, large and rapid pulse.

Recommended formula: Sheng Shi Gao (Gypsum fibrosum) (decocted first) 30-60g, Zhi Mu (Anemarrhenae Rhizoma) 30g, Sheng Di (Rehmanniae Radix) 30-60g, Shui Niu Jiao (Bubali Cornu) (decocted first) 30g, Chi Shao (Paeoniae Radix rubra) 30g, Xuan Shen (Scrophulariae Radix) 30g, Lian Qiao (Forsythiae Fructus) 15g, Dan Pi (Moutan Cortex) 15g, Huang Lian (Coptidis Rhizoma) 6g, Zhu Ye (Phyllostachys nigrae Folium) 12g, Ting Li Zi (Lepidii/Descurainiae Semen) 15g, Sheng Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 6g.

Administration: one pack daily, decoction, Shi Gao and Shui Niu Jiao should be decocted first, 100-200 ml each time, 2-4 times per day, oral administration or nasal feeding.

Recommended Chinese patent medicines: Xiyanping injection, Xuebijing injection, Reduning injection, Tanreqing injection, and Xingnaojing injection. Drugs with similar effects can be selected according to individual conditions, or can be used in combination according to clinical symptoms. Traditional Chinese medicine injection can be used together with TCM decoction.

5) Critical case

 Internal blockage and external desertion pattern

Clinical manifestation: Dyspnea, panting on exertion or mechanical ventilation required, accompanied with unconsciousness and dysphoria, sweating, cold extremities. The tongue is dark and purple with thick greasy or dry coating. The pulse is floating and large without root.

Recommended formula: Take Su He Xiang Wan or Angong Niuhuang Wan with the following decoction composed of Ren Shen (Ginseng Radix) 15g, Hei Shun Pian (Aconiti Radix lateralis praeparata) (decocted first) 10g, Shan Zhu Yu (Corni Fructus) 15g.

If there is mechanical ventilation with abdominal distension, constipation or difficult defecation, 5-10g of Sheng Da Huang (Rhei Radix et Rhizoma) can be considered. If patient-ventilator asynchrony occurs, 5-10g of Sheng Da Huang and 5-10g of Mang Xiao (Natrii Sulfas) can be used together with sedation and muscle relaxant.

Recommended Chinese patent medicines: Xuebijing injection, Reduning injection, Tanreqing injection, Xingnaojing injection, Shenfu injection, Shengmai injection, and Shenmai injection. Drugs with similar effects can be selected according to individual conditions, or can be used in combination according to clinical symptoms. Traditional Chinese medicine injection can be used together with TCM decoction.

Note: Recommended usage of TCM injections for severe and critical cases

The use of TCM injections follows the principle of starting from a small dosage and modifying based on pattern identification in the instructions. The recommended usage is as follows:

Viral infection or combined with mild bacterial infection: 0.9% sodium chloride injection 250ml with Xiyanping injection 100mg (bid), or 0.9% sodium chloride injection 250ml with Reduning injection 20ml, or 0.9% sodium chloride injection 250ml with Tanreqing injection 40ml (bid).

High fever with disturbance of consciousness: 0.9% sodium chloride injection 250ml with Xingnaojing injection 20ml (bid).

Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or / and multiple organ failure (MOF): 0.9% sodium chloride injection 250ml with Xuebijing injection 100ml (bid).

Immunosuppression: glucose injection 250ml with Shenmai injection 100ml or Shengmai injection 20-60ml (bid).

6) Convalescence

 Lung-spleen qi deficiency pattern

Clinical manifestation: shortness of breath, lassitude and fatigue, poor appetite with nausea and vomiting, abdominal fullness, a sense of incomplete evacuation, and sticky loose stool. The tongue is pale and enlarged with white greasy coating.

Recommended formula: Fa Ban Xia (Pinellinae Rhizoma Praeparatum) 9g, Chen Pi (Citri reticulatae Pericarpium) 10g, Dang Shen (Codonopsis Radix) 15g, Zhi Huang Qi (Astragali Radix) 30g, Chao Bai Zhu (Atractylodis macrocephalae Rhizoma) 10g, Fu Ling (Poria) 15g, Huo Xiang (Pogostemonis Herba) 10g, Sha Ren (AmomiFructus) (added later) 6g, Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 6g.

Administration: one package daily, 400ml after decocting, and equally divide into twice in the morning and evening.

 Deficiency of both qi and yin pattern

Clinical manifestation: fatigue, shortness of breath, dry mouth, thirst, heart palpitation, profuse sweating, poor appetite, low-grade fever or no fever, dry cough with little sputum. The tongue is dry tongue with scanty fluid. The pulse is thready or weak and forceless.

Recommended formula: Nan Sha Shen (Adenophorae Radix) 10g, Bei Sha Shen (Glehniae Radix) 10g, Mai Dong (Ophiopogonis Radix) 15g, Xi Yang Shen (Panacis quinquefolii Radix) 6g, Wu Wei Zi (Schisandrae Fructus) 6g, Sheng Shi Gao (Gypsum fibrosum) 15g, Dan Zhu Ye (Lophatheri Herba) 10g, Sang Ye (Mori Folium) 10g, Lu Gen (Phragmitis Rhizoma) 15g, Dan Shen (Salviae miltiorrhizae Radix) 15g, Sheng Gan Cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) 6g.

Administration: one package daily, 400ml after decocting, and equally divide into twice in the morning and evening.

Translated by Beijing University of Chinese Medicine
References
ww.satcm.gove.cn

Why is it good to drink ginger tea during coronavirus outbreak?

Ginger can help your defence system.

Macrophages a type of defence cells in the body play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions was shown that it regulates immune function by inhibiting macrophage activation. A study has shown that ginger ginger improves on cytotoxicity induced by paraben (p-hydroxybenzoic acid) on red blood cells (RBC) in vitro from healthy adult human beings (25-30 years).

Ginger can help protect human bronchial epithelial cells.

Traditionally, ginger is used as an antiinflammatory drug. A recent study tested the effect of ginger extract in inflammation of human bronchial epithelial cells. They found that ginger extracts can reduce inflammatory substances production and suggested that distinct ginger compounds could be used as antiinflammatory drugs in respiratory infections.

Ginger reduces inflammatory and oxidative stress

This review investigated the effects of ginger supplementation on markers of inflammatory and oxidative stress. They evaluated the effects of ginger on some inflammation markers including serum CRP (C-reactive protein), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha), IL-6 (interleukin-6), PGE2 (prostaglandin E2), TAC (total antioxidant capacity), and MDA (malondialdehyde). The results of this study indicated a statistically significant effect of ginger on serum CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, TAC, and MDA levels following ginger supplementation in compared to the controls. Also, the effects of ginger on serum PGE2 was marginally significant. They suggested that ginger supplementation has a significant effects on serum inflammatory and oxidative stress markers.

References

Tripathi S et al BMC Complement Altern Med. 2008 Jan 3;8:1. doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-8-1.

Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function.

Asnani V, Verma RJ. Acta Pol Pharm. 2006 Mar-Apr;63(2):117-9. Aqueous ginger extract ameliorates paraben induced cytotoxicity.

Podlogar JA, Verspohl EJ. Phytother Res. 2012 Mar;26(3):333-6. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3558. Epub 2011 Jun 23. Antiinflammatory effects of ginger and some of its components in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells.

Jalali M et al Phytother Res. 2020 Mar 8. doi: 10.1002/ptr.6638. [Epub ahead of print]

The effects of ginger supplementation on markers of inflammatory and oxidative stress: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

Wednesday, 3 June 2020

Why is it good to eat garlic during coronavirus pandemic?

The benefits of garlic to health have been indicated for centuries and the wide variety of effects garlic preparations and extracts has been reported are beneficial and useful. Recently garlic extract Allium sativum and its derivatives been proposed as promising candidates for maintaining the homeostasis of the immune system. A review assessed the most recent experimental results. They suggested that garlic boosts the functioning of the immune system by stimulating certain cell types, such as macrophages, lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells, and eosinophils, by mechanisms including modulation of cytokine secretion, immunoglobulin production, phagocytosis, and macrophage activation.

References
Arreola R et al J Immunol Res. 2015;2015:401630. doi: 10.1155/2015/401630. Epub 2015 Apr 19.

Tuesday, 2 June 2020

Jujubae Fructus, Jujube Fruits, Chinese jujube, Chinese dates

In ancient China, XuanYuan tribe had a large jujube forest in Xin Zheng, He Nan province. The fruits were called Da Zao Jujube. At the war of Yellow Emperor and Yan Emperor, the Yellow Emperor’s army went to the south in the rainy season. It was raining everyday and it was very humid. An infectious disease broke out in the army. Once people got infected, their face was yellow and swollen, their tummy was bloated. If they did not get treated in time, they would have risk to be defeated. The Yellow Emperor was extremely anxious, but the army doctor did not know how to treat this disease. A soldier named Zhang Chao who was a Chinese Medicine Doctor went back to his tent and brought some Da Zao produced in his hometown Xin Zheng as a primer to boil the herbs. All sick soldiers were recovered after taking the medicine. The whole army were very inspired and won the battle. Therefore, the Yellow Emperor unified China. The Yellow Emperor credited the Da Zao for the unification of China and warded Da Zao produced in Xin Zheng as a tribute to the Emperor.

There were proverbs about Da Zao: eating three Da Zao, you don’t need to see doctor; eating three Da Zao, you don’t look od at 100 year old; if you want sleep well, eat Da Zao before go to bed.

Another Da Zao story. A woman always felt sad and cried during the day every day without any reasons. Doctor gave her Hong Zao soup to take. Subsequently, she got better.

Jujube are the fruits of Ziziphus jujuba Mill and have been widely used as food and Chinese herbal medicine for over 3,000 years. In Huangdi Neijing (475-221 BC), an ancient Chinese book on herbal medicine, jujube was described as one of the five most valuable fruits in China. In Shennong Bencao Jing (300 BC-200 AD), an earlier book recoding medicinal herbs, jujube was considered as herbal medicines. Jujube are produced along the value of yellow river, Jujube from Xin Jiang province are the best. Jujube are sweet in flavour and warm in nature. They nourish blood, calm the mind, relieve mental tension, improve quality of sleep, and regulate digestive system.

Morden pharmacological effects of Jujube include

neuro protection, calming down the mind and improving quality of sleep, learning and memory.

Antidepression

containing amino acids, vitamins such as Vit C, minerals such as zinc.

References
Jianping Chen et al Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017; 2017: 3019568.

Monday, 1 June 2020

Sparkling of acupuncture fever in the US

Many people know Mr Henry Kissinger's secret trip from Pakistan to Beijing in 1971 paving the way for President Nixon's visit to China in 1972. To report this, the first U.S. reporter James Reston (1909e1995) was invited by Chinese government to visit China. When he arrived at Beijing at 12th July 1971 and it was too late because Mr Henry Kissinger has already left a day before. He missed a golden chance to cover the breaking news of Kissinger’s visit to China.

A few days later after his arrival, he was told this news. James Reston suddenly felt a stabbing pain in his groin. He went to see doctors in Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Anti-Imperialist Hospital and was diagnosed as acute appendicitis. Next day after an appendectomy surgery, he was in considerable uncomfortable and received acupuncture from Dr Zhangyuan Li. The needles were inserted into his right elbow and below his knees. The needles sent twinges of pain through Reston’s limbs and diverted his attention from the distress in his stomach. Meanwhile he also received moxibustion on his abdomen. There was noticeable relaxation of the pressure and distension within an hour and no recurrence of the problem thereafter. Reston wrote an article entitled Now, About My Operation in Peking in his hospital bed in China and this article appeared on the front page of the New York Times the next day along with the Apollo 15 lift-off on July 26,1971.

What a wonderful story for millions of Americans who were so curious about what was happening in China after its doors have been closed for more than twenty years. Reston's article was the first genuine American acupuncture experience in P. R. China to appear in the mainstream Western media. His story of the ‘Oriental Apollo’ unintentionally sparked widespread ‘acupuncture fever’ across the United States in the coming years. In early 70s, acupuncture stories appeared in many major American media and publications, including Time, People, Life, Newsweek and many more.

References
Yongming Li Journal of traditional Chinese medical sciences 2014 1:81-83

Chinese medicine story: Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae, Liquorice Root)

This story was recorded in Ming dynasty <Gen Ji Bian>. In a morning a Royal Chinese medicine doctor for Imperial Family named Sheng Yi...