Doctor who is passionate about acupuncture

Doctor who is passionate about acupuncture

Welcome to my blog

Leading acupuncture specialist for facial rejuvenation, pain relief, stress, anxiety, emotion, depression relief, fertility and miscarriage
Based at Kensington and Chelsea at Central London. Qualified as a medical doctor in Western medicine in China with a Medical degree from Beijing, China and a PhD degree from the UK. Many year research and clinical experiences. This blog is for information only.

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My Guest blog articles and Reviews

Guest blog articles

https://anamayahealth.blogspot.com/2018/03/dr-maggie-ju-talks-about-vulvodynia.html

Reviews and articles

Maggie Ju (2014) Current opinion in acupuncture on stroke rehabilitation

The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 21 Issue 2 September 2014 P9

Maggie Ju. (2015) What Part Does Acupuncture Play in IVF?

The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 22 Issue 1 March 2015 P21

Maggie Ju (2020) The Potentiality of COVID-19 Treatment with Chinese Herbal Medicine in the UK

The Journal of Chinese Medicine And Acupuncture Volume 27 Issue 2 November 2020 P9


Friday, 8 June 2018

What is tension triangle? How stress affects you? Acupuncture can help reduce stress and tension.

Tension triangle is involved in the face, head, neck and shoulders. The muscles in this triangle are very sensitive to stress and emotions causing tension for these muscles. According to research, in the first two or three seconds of emotional upset, the muscles around the eyes, mouth and jaw almost always tighten. Prolonged stress leads to a chronic shortening of the muscles. Under stress circumstances, people hold their body in a tension without realizing it; continuing buildup occurs when the stress is persisting. Over the time their neck and shoulder muscles get shorter and shorter. All of the muscles in the tension triangle are particularly vulnerable to pressure. For example corrugators and frontalis muscle on the forehead tighten in response to emotional tension. Chewing muscles such as the masseter and the temporalis also react to mental stress by tightening. Many people clench their teeth when tense. The trapezius, the large band of muscle spreads out from the base of the skull, down the neck, to the spine and shoulder blades. The trapezius helps the neck support the head. Also the sternomastoid muscles run down from the back of the ear along the sides of the neck to the chest. Sitting down on the desk for long time creates tension on these two muscles. The most common symptoms of problems in the tension triangle are the headaches and a stiff neck. Tense muscles in the jaw and neck cause headaches by constricting blood flow to the head and scalp. And tightness in the trapezius muscle causes stiff neck.

Muscle tension slows blood flow to the skin and muscles. Normally, the blood washes away the metabolic products which is toxic to the cells. But if the muscle stays tense, it becomes oxygen-starved and metabolites, say lactic acid, build up. The pain receptors in the muscles are sensitive both to shortening of the fibers and to a buildup of metabolites. When these receptors detect such conditions, they send a message of pain to the brain.

Immediate relief for a tense muscle comes from lengthening its fibers and getting the blood flowing to clear out the metabolites. Acupuncture is the best way to relax the muscles, release the muscle tension and restore blood flow.

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